Building a Coalition

Conservation Spotlight with Shane Mahoney
Author(s): 
Shane Mahoney

Should hunters fear a conservation coalition that includes nonhunters. 

Wild Harvest

Author(s): 
Shane Mahoney

Is it possible for humans to feed themselves without damaging the environment? Of course- it's called hunting. 

The Why and Relevance of Hunting

Author(s): 
Shane Mahoney

Conservation Matters with Shane Mahoney

Size, Influence, and Power: Are these the wings of leadership?

Conservation Matters...with Shane Mahoney. 

The Most Important Question Every Hunter Must Answer

Are you really a conservationist?
Author(s): 
Shane P. Mahoney

The hunting community often focuses upon its financial contributions towards conservation. However, in the author's view paying a tax established in 1937 on a rifle or ammunition today does not make anyone a conservationist, regardless of whether they hunt or not. So what does make someone a conservationist and how would you know if you met one? If hunters want to be known as conservationists, shouldn't the community be able to articulate what it means by the term?

The Dancing of Wolves and Men

A caribou’s-eye-view
Author(s): 
Shane P. Mahoney

Wolves have figured prominently in the lives and the imaginations of men seemingly forever. In both the Great Lakes region and the Northern Rocky Mountains, wolves have been increasing in numbers and expanding their range. Maintaining the big carnivores has been one of the great achievements of North America's hunter-led conservation movement. There will need to be a balancing act to maintain some equilibrium between wolf numbers and the prey that both wolves and men seek. Hunters must be the champion of the wolf, the champion of the elk and the champion of sustainable use for them all.

North American Wildlife Conservation:Revolutions Every Citizen Should Know

Author(s): 
Shane P. Mahoney

Unfortunately the wild abundance of America today is often taken for granted. Citizens of Canada and the United States have come to expect wildlife diversity as part of their cultural experience and remain largely uninformed of the heroic efforts that led to this priceless wild legacy and the complex infrastructure that ensures its continued presence in our lives. Addressing this lack of awareness by North American society is beyond question one of the great social responsibilities for the conservation movement in this 21st century.