The influence of snow depth and hardness on winter habitat selection by caribou on the southwest coast of Newfoundland

Rangifer
Author(s): 
Brian Tucker, Shane Mahoney, Bill Greene, Eric Menchenton, Lloyd Russell

LaPoile Herd caribou winter in the coastal margin of their range in southwestern Newfoundland. Reduced snow depths near the coast (0-20 km inland), as a result of moderated winter temperatures and low elevations, appear to provide more favourable foraging conditions than do areas further inland. In the latter areas greatly increased snow depth and hardness combine to create very extreme winter conditions and these areas are avoided by caribou throughout the winter period.

The relationship between weather and caribou productivity for the LaPoile Caribou Herd, Newfoundland

Rangifer
Author(s): 
Steven H. Ferguson and Shane P. Mahoney

To describe the relationship between weather and caribou (Rangifer tarandus) productivity, the authors compared weather variables (snow on ground, winter temperature and measures of growing season) with measures of productivity (calves seen by hunters, calves and yearlings in the harvest and percent calves and yearlings and pregnancy rate for caribou classified during fall and spring surveys) for the LaPoile Caribou Herd in southwestern Newfoundland. Hunter statistics reliably estimated changes in population demography.

Morphological change in Newfoundland caribou: Effects of abundance and climate

Rangifer
Author(s): 
Shane P. Mahoney, Jackie N. Weir, J. Glenn Luther, James A. Schaefer, & Shawn F. Morrison

The demographic and environmental influences on large mammal morphology are central questions in ecology. The authors investigated the effects of population abundance and climate on body size and number of male antler points for the La Poile and Middle Ridge caribou (Rangifer tarandus, L. 1758) herds, Newfoundland, Canada. Across 40 years and 20-fold changes in abundance, adult males and females exhibited diminished stature as indicated by jawbone size (diastema and total mandible length) and the number of antler points at the time of harvest.

Caribou reactions to provocation by snowmachines in Newfoundland

Rangifer
Author(s): 
Shane P. Mahoney, K. Mawhinney, C. McCarthy, Doug Anions, and S. Taylor

Caribou in Gros Morne National Park reacted to provocation by snowmachine with significant differences in their response between years. Upon exposure to snowmachines, caribou were displaced 60 to 237 m from their initial locations. Groups with calves allowed the snowmachines to approach more closely before responding (5 to 600 m) than adult-only groups (30 to 1300 m), and their overall flight distances were less. Time spent in locomotion and overall reaction time were greater for animals engaged in the most sedentary activities (eg.