The Trend towards Bio-Politics

A Newfoundland Case Study
Canadian Wildlife Administration
Author(s): 
Shane P. Mahoney

In March 1975, Newfoundland Hydro announced that four hydroelectric developments were being considered to meet the forecast provinical energy requirements up to 1983. The proposed development resulted in a major wildlife study of great prominence in Newfoundland and nationally. The Upper Salmon caribou project served to convince Newfoundland Hydro that provincial wildlife managers were serious about environment protection.

Society, Science, and the Economy

Exploring the Emerging New Order in Wildlife Conservation
Wildlife Science: Linking Ecological Theory and Management Applications
Author(s): 
Shane P. Mahoney

Historical perspectives of the wildlife conservation movement reveal the complex interplay between evolving states of knowledge and evolving societal values and expectations. Wildlife science has matured greatly since its first beginning, but like many other disciplines finds difficulty in striking a balance between its historical focus and the knowledge requirements imposed by current social and ecological realities. Nevertheless, to maintain its relevance in the 21st century our discipline must find this balance.

Recreational Hunting and Sustainable Wildlife Use in North America

Recreational Hunting; Conservation and Rural Livelihoods: Science and Practice
Author(s): 
Shane P. Mahoney

Upon North America's settlement by Europeans wildlife, harvested for commercial use, suffered great losses in population numbers. The North American Model emerged as a sustainable solution to manage wildlife by maintaining wildlife as a public trust, prohibiting the commerce of wildlife products, allocating wildlife by law, using wildlife for legitimate purposes, preserving hunting for all, recognizing wildlife as an international resource, and using science as the basis for management and policy.

Foreward: Newfoundland and Its Untrodden Ways

Author(s): 
Shane P. Mahoney

Millais's work, reprinted after a century, is both a classic work of its period and an irreplaceable commentary in our understanding of Newfoundland's recent past and culture. The text offers valuable insight into the abundance and quality of Newfoundland caribou a century ago, and provides detailed descriptions of landscapes then undisturbed, but now increasingly altered by human intrusion and development.

Adaptive Management in Wildlife Conservation

The Wildlife Techniques Manual: Management
Author(s): 
John F. Organ, Daniel J. Decker, Shawn J. Riley, John E. McDonald, Jr., and Shane P. Mahoney

Adaptive management in wildlife conservation emerged from the wildlife profession's search for better solutions to increasingly complex conservation challenges. Adaptive management is an effective process for wildlife managers to employ to (1) deal with uncertainty in the management system, (2) learn from their management actions, and (3) achieve desired results. Being adaptable or flexible in your management approach is not the same as managing adaptively or conducting adaptive management. Adaptive management requires adhering to a stepwise process and fully executing each step.